Forget Politics – Change the World Yourself




All we need is to imagine a better system, implement our ideas, and inspire others to do the same.

 

Forget Politics – Change the World Yourself

As an advocate of liberty, promoting a non-interventionist philosophy proved counter productive. Albeit good intentions, the majority of people I was reaching were apathetic to politics. Thus, tabling, making telephone calls, and knocking on doors felt intrusive and unwarranted.

All power to the extroverted balls of energy bringing fire to the streets and changing lives with their burning enthusiasm of freedom. Those who are able to successfully recruit through activism are greatly valued. On the other hand, for those of us who are not as activism savvy, there is an alternative. There are many ways to spread the principles of freedom.

The majority of people ignore politics, yet they will gladly blow their paycheck on the latest iPhone.

Why is this important?

Prior to 1982, the government held a monopoly on telephones with AT&T.  I am sure many libertarians advocated for less government during this time. But, I am less certain their rhetoric changed the minds of the masses.

Nonetheless, when the monopoly broke up, the free market provided an alternative which the people preferred.  In other words, the libertarian movement did not need to convince people of the free market. Rather, the free market took away the need for government in that domain.

TK Coleman, education director at Praxis, explains this idea with an analogy:

“[Neil Degrasse Tyson] says, that whenever there is a mystery people resort to God as the default explanation. But, once science comes along and explains a mystery, that area becomes a domain of science. For example, now when people get a cold they don’t simply pray for the cold to go away. Now, they take medicine or they combine the power of prayer with medicine. Neil DeGrasse Tyson explains that by pushing the boundaries of science we continue to make the God hypothesis an ever receding pocket of scientific ignorance.

Now, I think the philosophy of religion is much more complicated than that, and I’m not here to make a case for or against religion. But I think there is a really good analogy here for seeing the state. Just as Neil says that the God hypothesis is an ever receding pocket of scientific ignorance I believe that the government hypothesis is an ever receding pocket of economic illiteracy.”

Libertarians talk about free market approaches, but they don’t always practice what they preach. There are many opportunities for which to challenge government systems which simply aren’t being pursued.

TK Coleman, for example, is battling the education system through Praxis.  The program helps to educate, train, and place people in careers of their own choosing. Praxis, however, takes less than half the time of a university at the fraction of the cost.

This is just one example of the market challenging the government. BitCoin is disrupting the way we exchange currency. Uber is disrupting the way we travel. And we can be disrupting any and all other domains of government control. Libraries, licenses, and even roads could be the start to a more free and open society.

Entrepreneurship is the key to abolishing the state. Once the free market can provide better and more efficient healthcare, police, roads, sewers, and other societal commodities, there will be no reason to hold to the belief of the state.

The government holds no power against the citizens, but rather, the citizens hold power against the government. Even if the government were not to exist, it would still be the duty of the free market to provide goods and services.

For this reason, I urge the community to fight the government through entrepreneurial means. Whether conservative, liberal, or libertarian, anyone can take notice of a government provided services and challenge them with free market alternatives.

We need not argue with friends to change the world. Nor do we need to spam Facebook comments to change the world. We need not even march, chant, or protest to change the world.

All we need is to imagine a better system, implement our ideas, and inspire others to do the same. Once the creativity of society has taken over the free market, the government will fail to compete.

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About Austin Mulka 1 Article
Austin Mulka is a Campus Coordinator at Students for Liberty and the owner and host of the podcast Suffrage and Sovereignty. As a musician, martial artist, and philosopher, Austin devotes his time reading, learning, and experiencing everything he can about life and its wonders. He is currently studying linguistics at the University of Michigan - Dearborn and hopes to go on to pursue a Ph.D. and career in cognitive sciences.

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